everything

Do you suspect you or a loved one have an

irregular heartbeat?

Have you been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation?

You've come to the right place.

The AFib Center of the Heart Institute of Doylestown Hospital, is a one-stop resource with invaluable information about degenerative heart rhythm disorder, heart disorder symptoms, and atrial fibrillation treatment options available to you right in Bucks County.

 

Services

The AFib Center is a comprehensive facility offering inpatient and outpatient treatments to control and eliminate atrial fibrillation. The Center draws upon the top-rated expertise and resources of the Heart Institute of Doylestown Hospital to offer a broad range of individually tailored therapies. These range from lifestyle management and medication to state-of-the-art treatment options such as radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation and convergent ablation procedures.

Our Doctors

Searching for the area's best AFib doctors? Look no further than the AFib Center of the Heart Institute of Doylestown Hospital. Our physicians specializing in the treatment of irregular heart rhythms include:

Electrophysiologists

harding sangrigoli sloan
John
Harding, MD
Robert
Sangrigoli, MD
Stephen
Sloan, MD

Cardiothoracic Surgeon

auteri
Joseph
S. Auteri, MD

The experience of our AFib team provides Bucks, Montgomery and surrounding areas access to specialized care and treatment for complex cases close to home. Our AFib ablation success rates place us as among the leading AFib centers across the United States.

The Heart Institute at Doylestown Hospital

The Richard A. Reif Heart Institute of Doylestown Hospital is ranked #2 in the United States for 30-day heart attack survival, as reported by the federal government. Patients experiencing a heart attack are more likely to survive at Doylestown Hospital than any other hospital in Pennsylvania. For the second year in a row, Doylestown's outcomes place the hospital in the upper echelon of quality care providers.

Whether you need emergency cardiac care, treatment for a chronic condition or help managing risk factors for heart disease, the experts at The Richard A. Reif Heart Institute of Doylestown Hospital are dedicated to providing the highest level of quality care and patient safety.

heart

Atrial fibrillation is the most common form of irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia).

When the electrical pulses that power the heart fail to travel in an orderly fashion through the upper chambers of the heart, multiple impulses spread simultaneously, causing a fast, chaotic rhythm. As a result, the atria cannot contract or squeeze blood effectively into the ventricle, which in turn causes a rapid, irregular heartbeat.

AFib has been indicated as a major risk factor for stroke and heart failure. The National Stroke Association estimates that approximately 15 percent of all people who have strokes also have AFib, and individuals with atrial fibrillation are five times more likely to have a stroke. Therefore heart attack and stroke prevention for AFib is an important consideration when weighing therapeutic options.

Treatment options depend on how long you've had the condition, how troublesome your symptoms are, and the underlying cause of your atrial fibrillation.

Ideal treatment goals include resetting the heart rhythm, controlling the heart rate and preventing blood clots. Treatment plans vary from person to person, but may include medication, a cardiac catheter ablation procedure, or surgery such as the convergent maze procedure for hard-to-treat arrhythmias.

 

What is AFib?

Atrial fibrillation is the most common form of irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia). When the electrical pulses that power the heart fail to travel in an orderly fashion through the atria (the upper chambers of the heart), multiple impulses spread simultaneously, causing a fast, chaotic rhythm. As a result, the atria cannot contract or squeeze blood effectively into the ventricle, which in turn causes a rapid, irregular heartbeat.

Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is an arrhythmia that occurs at varying intervals, rather than consistently or constantly.

What are the symptoms of AFib?

Symptoms of AFib include heart palpitations, abnormal heart rhythm, chest pain or abdominal pain, shortness of breath, lightheadedness and fatigue.

I've been diagnosed with AFib. Should I be concerned?

In some instances, the symptoms of AFib are temporary. Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), also called intermittent AF, is defined as two or more episodes of AFib that end spontaneously in less than seven days, usually in less than 24 hours. Treatment for management of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation may be different from that of an individual with a permanent atrial fibrillation prognosis.

AFib is frequently associated with heart disease and stroke. The National Stroke Association estimates that approximately 15 percent of all people who have strokes also have AFib, and the risk of stroke is five times greater for individuals with atrial fibrillation. Therefore heart attack and stroke prevention for AFib is an important consideration when weighing therapeutic options.

What are the options for AFib treatment?

The least invasive options for treatment of atrial fibrillation include lifestyle management and medication to control the arrhythmia. An outpatient procedure, electrical cardioversion for AFib delivers low-energy AFib shock treatment to restore normal rhythm. Resynchronization therapies may be used for high-risk patients; these include pacemakers and ICD for heart procedure (implantable cardioverter defibrillators).

The AFib Center is one of 10 facilities in the nation offering a newly approved cardiac ablation therapy called cryoablation. This heart ablation procedure uses a freezing agent rather than heat to create lesions that block irregular signals.

Convergent ablation is an innovative team approach in which an experienced cardiothoracic surgeon delivers energy to the heart from the outside while an electrophysiologist delivers energy to the inner areas of the heart.

As new medications and treatments for irregular heartbeats become available, look to the AFib Center to take the lead in bringing these services to Bucks County.

Are there conditions similar to AFib?

Yes. Atrial Flutter (AFL) is a heart rhythm disorder that is similar to the more common AFib. In AFib, the heart beats fast without a regular pattern or rhythm. With AFL, the heart beats fast in a regular pattern.

Another relatively common rhythm disorder, Premature Ventricular Contractures (PVC) also referred to as a "skipped beat" is an arrhythmia that produces an irregular heartbeat. PVCs may occur in healthy people of any age and usually do not pose a danger in healthy individuals.

A closely related disorder, Ventricular Tachycardia is a fast heart rhythm that starts in the lower part of the heart (ventricles).

Next Steps

Consult with one of our professionals to discuss which cardiac arrhythmia treatment is right for you. Contact the AFib Center by using the information to the right of this page.Contact the AFib Center by using the information below.

Want to learn more about AFib?

Complete this form to watch a video about the AFib Center at Doylestown Hospital and request more information.



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